first_img TV and Movies The 2019 Oscars were Sunday. If you’re feeling inspired to see some of the winning films you didn’t catch earlier, here’s a guide to where you can stream, rent or buy the majority of them. Sorry in advance, but there are still quite a few you’ll have to catch in theaters — not that you need a movie subscription service to do so, but it can’t hurt. Disclaimer: CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. 40 films (and a tech company) you didn’t know won Oscars For more information on what’s available to watch online, check out CNET.com/Netpicks or subscribe to the podcast — it’s free! And go to CNET sister site TVGuide.com to see what else is out in the world of streaming. Audio (weekly): RSS | iTunes | Google Play Video (monthly): iTunes (HD) | iTunes (HQ) | iTunes (SD) | RSS (HD) | RSS (HQ)| RSS (SD) 42 Photos Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Supporting Actor  Green Book Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu Best Director, Cinematography, Foreign Language Film Roma Streaming: Netflix Rent/Buy: Nope Best Actor, Sound Mixing, Sound Editing Bohemian Rhapsody Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu Best Costume Design, Production Design, Original Score Black Panther Streaming: Netflix Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Best Adapted Screenplay BlacKkKlansman Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Best Actress  The Favourite Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Best Original Song  A Star is Born Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Google Play, iTunes, YouTube, Microsoft Store, Movies Anywhere Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga in A Star is Born. Warner Bros Best Supporting Actress If Beale Street Could Talk Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Still in theaters Best Makeup and Hairstyling Vice Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Still in theaters Best Visual Effects First Man Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Best Animated FilmSpider-Man: Into the Spider-VerseStreaming: NopeRent/Buy: Still in theatersBest Documentary – FeatureFree SoloStreaming: NopeRent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTubeBest Documentary – Short SubjectPeriod. End of SentenceStreaming: Netflix Best Animated Short FilmBaoStreaming: NopeRent/Buy: YouTube, Google Play RGBIncredibles 2 Pixar All other nominated films A Quiet Place Streaming: EPIX Rent/Buy:  Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Avengers: Infinity War Streaming: Netflix Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube The Ballad of Buster Scruggs Streaming: Netflix Rent/Buy: Nope Can You Ever Forgive Me? Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Capernaum Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Still in theaters Cold War Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Still in theaters At Eternity’s Gate Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube First Reformed Streaming: Amazon, KanopyRent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Hale County This Morning, This Evening Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Still in theaters Incredibles 2 Streaming: Netflix  Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Isle of Dogs Streaming: HBO Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Mary Poppins Returns Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Still in theaters Mary Queen of Scots Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes Minding the Gap Streaming: Hulu, PBSRent/Buy: Nope Mirai Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Still in theaters Never Look Away Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Still in theaters Of Fathers and Sons Streaming: KanopyRent/Buy: Still in theaters cropralphbreakstheinternetRalph Breaks the Internet Disney Ralph Breaks the Internet Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube RBG Streaming: Hulu, HooplaRent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Ready Player One Streaming: HBO Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube Shoplifters Streaming: HooplaRent/Buy: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube The Wife Streaming: Nope Rent/Buy: Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, YouTube 0 Post a commentcenter_img Now playing: Watch this: Stream these 2019 Oscar nominees now 2:33 Tags Share your voice Marvel Target Oscars 2019 Amazon Google Play iTunes Netflix YouTube The Avengerslast_img read more

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first_imgRepresentational image of workers preparing for laying undersea cable.IBT MediaThe military standoff between Indian and Chinese soldiers in the Sikkim sector of the border and the resultant diplomatic sparring could put telecom operator Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL) in a spot over its undersea cable project that seeks to connect Chennai and Port Blair.The state-owned BSNL’s ambitious project has apparently raised security fears, according to a report in the BusinessLine. “We have to check all the provisions from a national security perspective,” the business daily quoted a department of telecom (DoT) source as saying.The Union Cabinet had approved the submarine telecom cable project last September to connect mainland India with the Andaman and Nicobar Islands at an estimated cost of Rs 1,102 crore.However, the security establishment had expressed concerns about allowing Chinese telecom firms to bid for the project, given the strategic implications, though the defence ministry has put the ball in the home ministry’s court.”It is not up to the Defence Ministry to decide. The Ministry of Home Affairs will take a final call on this issue,” the daily quoted a senior defence ministry official as saying.Besides, Indian telecom suppliers have also voiced concerns against allowing the Chinese to bid for the project. “Chinese companies have their government’s support for such bids. Our government should be wary of giving them tenders that can render us vulnerable later,” an industry source told the BusinessLine. The Telecom Equipment Manufacturers Association has also written separately to the DoT, asking the government to ensure that Chinese players are kept out. But they need to factor in the reality that given the global bidding for the project, an exclusionist approach won’t work. Some of the companies operating in the undersea cable space include Alcatel-Lucent, Fujitsu, NEC, NSW, TE Subcom and Xtera. The BusinessLine listed Huawei Marine and ZTT Submarine as potential bidders citing sources, while domestic bidders could include Sterlite Technologies, Himachal Futuristic Communications and Paramount Wires and Cables.last_img read more

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first_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Popular on Variety “Because of the government shutdown, some of our scheduled government speakers at CES 2019 have alerted us that they must cancel their travel to the show,” Shapiro said in a statement. “As a result, some of our scheduled CES 2019 programming and speakers will change.”In addition to Pai, Carr and Slaughter, others canceling CES appearances include reps from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Department of Homeland Security; the Federal Emergency Management Agency; and the Food and Drug Administration.For now, among officials still scheduled to appear are U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao, set to deliver a keynote speech Wednesday, Jan. 9, from 11 a.m.-noon PT. Her talk will focus on the “future of drones and self-driving technology and how they will revolutionize transportation,” according to the CTA.CTA expects more than 182,000 attendees for 2019 CES, which officially runs Jan. 8-11. Follow updates from the show, including coverage of the full-day Variety Entertainment Summit at CES on Wednesday, Jan. 9, at this link. Read Variety‘s preview of technologies to watch at the world’s biggest consumer-electronics convention.center_img FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and other U.S. government officials will be no-shows at CES 2019 this week as a result of agency funding lapses from the ongoing government shutdown.Pai had been scheduled for a one-on-one interview with Consumer Technology Assn. president/CEO Gary Shapiro on Tuesday, Jan. 8, from 1:30-2 p.m. PT. Pai, a Republican-appointed commissioner named head of the FCC by Donald Trump, also canceled his trip to 2018 CES, coming after his controversial proposal to roll back Obama-era network neutrality rules in December 2017 and targeted harassment of Pai and his family over the issue.In a statement Saturday, the CTA — the trade group that runs CES — said some other U.S. government personnel would not be making the trip to Vegas either because of the shutdown. Sessions pulled from the schedule include a panel with FCC commissioner Brendan Carr and FTC commissioner Rebecca Slaughter previously set for Jan. 8.last_img read more

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first_img However, Mansuripur’s bold claim of a paradox with the Lorentz law has generated some intense criticism. One critic, Daniel Vanzella, a physics professor at the University of Sao Paulo in Sao Carlos, Brazil, has submitted a comment to Physical Review Letters arguing that the Lorentz law is perfectly compatible with special relativity, and that Mansuripur has misunderstood relativistic mechanics. The only paradox, Vanzella says, is why the high-ranking journal accepted the paper in the first place.Charge-magnet paradoxThe basis of Mansuripur’s argument is that the Lorentz law violates special relativity by producing different results in different reference frames. According to special relativity, the laws of physics – including electromagnetism – must be the same in all non-accelerating reference frames. He describes a scenario in which a magnetic dipole and a nearby electric charge are located a certain distance apart. When the magnet and the electric charge are at rest, no net force is exchanged between the two. This is because static electric charges only produce electric fields (to which the magnet is oblivious), and static magnets only produce magnetic fields (to which the static electric charge is oblivious). Both the Lorentz law and the Einstein-Laub version give the same result: the magnet experiences neither a force nor a torque from the electric charge.However, the Lorentz law gives a different result when a stationary observer watches the magnet and electric charge in a moving reference frame. Here, the observer sees the moving electric charge exert a torque on the moving magnet, causing the magnet to rotate as it tries to align itself with the electric field. The presence of this torque differs from the observation in the stationary reference frame where there is no torque.On the other hand, the Einstein-Laub formula, when combined with a corresponding torque formula, gives zero torque value for observers in both reference frames, complying with special relativity.The Lorentz law’s incompatibility with special relativity is not its only shortcoming, according to Mansuripur. Another equally important issue is the long-standing problem of “hidden momentum,” in which he shows that the Lorentz law fails to conserve momentum in certain situations involving magnetic media. In contrast, the Einstein-Laub equations show complete consistency with the conservation laws. For Mansuripur, this evidence indicates that the Einstein-Laub formula should be considered as a better way to understand classical electrodynamics. (Phys.org) — The laws of classical electromagnetism that were developed in the 19th century are the same laws that scientists use today. They include Maxwell’s four equations along with the Lorentz law, which describes the force exerted by electric and magnetic fields on charged particles. But Masud Mansuripur, a professor of Optical Sciences at The University of Arizona in Tucson, is now arguing that the Lorentz law of force is incompatible with special relativity and momentum conservation, and should be abandoned. In a recent issue of Physical Review Letters, he has suggested replacing the Lorentz law with a more general expression of electromagnetic force density, such as one developed by Albert Einstein and Jakob Laub in 1908. Best yet test of Lorentz invariance “This work provides a firm basis for all calculations of force, torque, momentum and angular momentum whenever electromagnetic fields (microwave, light, etc.) interact with material media,” Mansuripur told Phys.org. “The electromagnetic momentum and angular momentum become well-defined universal entities (i.e., the Abraham momentum), the need for ‘hidden momentum’ disappears, and satisfaction of conservation laws as well as conformity with special relativity are guaranteed.He explains that, during the past century, there has been a proliferation of equations for force and torque in the scientific literature, with scientists using several different formulas for the electromagnetic momentum. “My paper fixes the foundational equations and allows researchers to compare their experimental results against a single, well-defined theory,” he said.Quantum natureAccording to Mansuripur, the underlying reason for the difference between the Lorentz law and Einstein-Laub formula involves how each equation mathematically describes the quantum nature of electromagnetic fields and media. For its part, the Lorentz law depicts electric and magnetic dipoles as pairs of positive and negative charges or stable loops of current that interact with electromagnetic fields in terms of free and bound charges and currents. In contrast, the Einstein-Laub formula describes material media as spatio-temporal distributions of charge, current, polarization, and magnetization. Mansuripur explains why this distinction is important.“The fact that the electron orbits inside atoms and molecules are stable is a quantum-mechanical phenomenon,” he said. “Neither Maxwell’s equations nor the Lorentz law of force (and nor, for that matter, the Einstein-Laub force/torque equations) can account for the stability of the electron orbit. The fact that electrons, protons and neutrons have a magnetic moment associated with their spin angular momentum is also a relativistic quantum effect that has no explanation within classical physics. What Maxwell’s equations and the Lorentz law (or the Einstein-Laub law) do is provide formulas that describe the behavior of fields and material media as they are, without attempting to justify that behavior. The Lorentz law, however, simplifies the underlying physics by assuming that electric and magnetic dipoles can be treated as distributions of ordinary electrical charge and current. In contrast, the Einstein-Laub equation and the accompanying torque equation treat free charge, free current, electric dipoles, and magnetic dipoles as four distinct constituents of material media.“So, for example, the fact that a magnetic dipole is associated with something resembling a loop of current is a quantum mechanical effect. The Lorentz law does not ignore this fact, but it takes the resemblance to a current loop too far, treating the magnetic dipole as if it were actually a loop of ordinary current. In contrast, the Einstein-Laub formula acknowledges that magnetic dipoles exist as distinct entities – what makes them distinct is quantum mechanics, of course, but Einstein-Laub does not attempt to justify the existence of these dipoles or their nature. The Einstein-Laub formulas then provide a ‘recipe’ for calculating the force and torque on these dipoles, which turns out to be different from the ‘recipe’ provided by the Lorentz law.”No paradox?One critic of Mansuripur’s ideas, Vanzella, thinks that the paper is so flawed that it should not have been published at all. In his comment submitted to the journal, Vanzella points out that the Lorentz force can be put in a covariant form. In special relativity, a covariant law cannot lead to incompatible descriptions of the same phenomenon in different inertial reference frames. He explains that Mansuripur has incorrectly used relativistic mechanics and ignored a hidden momentum that makes the Lorentz formula predict a torque in one reference frame but not another. “This has blown way out of proportion,” Vanzella said. “Let me begin by stating the most important point: there is no incompatibility between the Lorentz force and special relativity. This is not a matter of opinion: any relativist knows that this is impossible for any specially-covariant law (as is the Lorentz force). By construction, a specially-covariant law is compatible with special relativity. This means that if it leads to a satisfactory description of a phenomenon in one inertial frame, then it leads to consistent descriptions in any inertial frame; there are no paradoxes.”He added that apparent paradoxes appear frequently when dealing with special relativity, but these paradoxes are actually due to simply missing or overlooking part of the relativistic argument. He says that a very similar “paradox” to the charge-magnet paradox, called the Trouton-Noble paradox, was presented and resolved more than 100 years ago. “In this particular case, using a current loop in a perfectly-conducting ring to model the magnet’s magnetic moment, one has to use special relativity to show that, even when the ring is at rest, the total momentum of the system is not zero (when subject to an external electric field),” he explained. “This momentum has been termed ‘hidden’ in the literature and this has led to some confusion, but let me stress that it is real momentum. Mansuripur is missing the point that this momentum is not an ad hoc invention only to solve paradoxes; its existence is forced upon us (upon Nature, actually) due to the principles of special relativity alone. In my comment I do not postulate the existence of this momentum. I simply use special relativity to calculate it; no additional hypothesis other than special relativity and the Lorentz force. Therefore, when Mansuripur dismisses this ‘hidden’ momentum he is doing exactly what I said is needed to arrive at a paradox: missing or overlooking part of the relativistic argument.”Despite his strong disagreement with Mansuripur, he emphasized that his criticism does not suggest anything against Mansuripur’s scientific credibility.“Please note that I don’t think that Mansuripur not knowing the solution of the ‘charge-magnet paradox’ (or not understanding the given solution) is that bad,” Vanzella said. “Special relativity is certainly not his expertise and confuses a lot of people, even physicists.”He also added that he’s not necessarily arguing that the Lorentz law must be the correct law of force, either, but just that special relativity cannot be used to testify against it. The question of which law is correct is an experimental issue. Still, he’s adamant that there is no paradox in this situation.“I wouldn’t even call Mansuripur’s idea ‘controversial,’” he said. “Would you call ‘controversial’ the idea that the Earth is flat? It is simply and provably wrong (I mean the claim that the Lorentz force is incompatible with special relativity).”In a response to Vanzella’s comment, also submitted to Physical Review Letters, Mansuripur has stuck to his original argument, explaining that there is no need to introduce hidden momentum, and that the Trouton-Noble paradox was subtly but significantly different than the charge-magnet paradox.Future of Einstein-LaubDespite the advantages of Einstein-Laub formula, Mansuripur acknowledges that it is not without its own problems. In 1979, physicist Iver Brevik performed an extensive review of the Einstein-Laub formula and other possible candidates for an energy-momentum tensor for the electromagnetic field. In some of the experiments, the Einstein-Laub formula did not match actual observations as closely as another formula, the Helmholtz force equation. However, Mansuripur argues that, due to the potential significance of this idea, the contrary evidence deserves a closer examination.“My colleagues and I are currently trying to identify situations where the distinction between the Lorentz law and the Einstein-Laub formulation is unambiguous, then try to conduct experiments to determine which law is operative in such situations,” he said. “Personally, I don’t attach much significance to the historical evidence against the Einstein-Laub formulation as reviewed in the paper by Brevik. The experiments were all electrostatic experiments, involving the flow of some dielectric fluid into a capacitor. The theoretical methods used to analyze the problem were extremely confusing; many approximations were made, and the Einstein-Laub formula itself was never used directly; instead they used a stress tensor associated with Einstein-Laub, which I have shown elsewhere to be incorrect.Mansuripur also plans to further investigate what he thinks has been a much overlooked distinction between the two formulas: a term that describes the force density of an electric field acting on the polarization density of a material medium. Whereas the Lorentz law uses –(del.P)E, the Einstein-Laub formula uses (P.del)E. Although the two formulations give exactly the same total force and total torque on any solid object, differences emerge when dealing with soft objects.“If applied to soft objects such as biological cells under intense illumination or droplets of oil or water in optical tweezers, the two formulas give different force and torque ‘distributions’ throughout the object,” he said. “This difference in force/torque distribution will then manifest itself in different deformations of the object under intense illumination. Our near-term goal, therefore, is to look for deformations of soft objects in optical tweezers experiments. A long-term goal is to look for observable differences between Lorentz and Einstein-Laub in magnetic materials.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Charge-magnet paradox: the point electric charge q and the point magnetic dipole to its right are separated by distance d in the x’y’z’ frame. An observer in the x’y’z’ frame sees no torque, but a stationary observer in the xyz frame watching the x’y’z’ system move with constant velocity along the z axis sees the moving electric charge exert a torque on the moving magnet. Image credit: Mansuripur. ©2012 American Physical Society More information: Masud Mansuripur, “Trouble with the Lorentz Law of Force: Incompatibility with Special Relativity and Momentum Conservation.” Physical Review Letters 108, 193901 (2012). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.193901 Explore further Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Is a classical electrodynamics law incompatible with special relativity? (2012, May 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-05-classical-electrodynamics-law-incompatible-special.html Journal information: Physical Review Letterslast_img read more

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first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Pair claim they have turned hydrogen to metal Citation: Researchers successfully transform liquid deuterium into a metal (2015, June 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-06-successfully-liquid-deuterium-metal.html More information: Direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium, Science 26 June 2015: Vol. 348 no. 6242 pp. 1455-1460. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa7471ABSTRACTEighty years ago, it was proposed that solid hydrogen would become metallic at sufficiently high density. Despite numerous investigations, this transition has not yet been experimentally observed. More recently, there has been much interest in the analog of this predicted metallic transition in the dense liquid, due to its relevance to planetary science. Here, we show direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium. Experimental determination of the location of this transition provides a much-needed benchmark for theory and may constrain the region of hydrogen-helium immiscibility and the boundary-layer pressure in standard models of the internal structure of gas-giant planets.Press release (Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at Sandia National Labs working with another team from the University of Rostock in Germany, has succeeded in squeezing liquid deuterium into becoming what appeared to be a metal. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their new technique which has brought researchers closer to the ultimate goal of creating solid metallic hydrogen. Schematic phase diagram of hydrogen. The figure shows the four known solid phases I to IV and two observed liquid phases, together with the predicted atomic liquid. Blue rings imply rotating quantum molecules, wiggly lines imply entangled rotor state, and solid bonds are where calculation shows a covalent bond. Credit: Science 26 June 2015: Vol. 348 no. 6242 pp. 1429-1430. DOI: 10.1126/science.aac6626center_img Journal information: Science © 2015 Phys.org Explore further Back in 1935, a pair of researchers, Hillard Bell Huntington and Eugene Wigner first showed via theory that it should be possible to create solid metallic hydrogen—all that was needed was sufficient pressure. Since that time, various teams have attempted to prove that theory correct, but to date, none have been successful. In this new effort, the research team has developed a new way to add pressure that does not cause other problems. Other than pride, the only real benefit of pursuing the objective is the information that can be gleaned from such efforts, information that might prove useful in studying other planets, for example—it could shed light on the forces necessary to produce observed phenomenon.Up till now, the technique used to pressurize hydrogen, has been based on squeezing samples of it between two diamond tips—such experiments have shown that it is possible to get compounds rich in hydrogen to become metal-like.In this new effort, the researchers noted that using the dual diamond tip approach was unlikely to result in achieving the ultimate goal due to the problem of sample materials becoming too reactive. They chose to go another route, making use of the massive Sandia Z machine—it is capable of creating magnetic fields up to 20 mega gauss—they first pressurized a sample of liquid deuterium (a hydrogen isotope) then caused a jolt of current from the Z machine to move through an electrode, which in turn hit the front of the container holding the deuterium—that caused a shockwave to move through the sample, condensing it further. As the material was condensed, the researchers measured how well the sample reflected light, a common means for identifying a metal. As the sample was condensed, it moved from a transparent state, to one that was reflective. This, the team claims, shows that the material clearly moved from an insulator to a metal.The results by this new team are the closest yet to creating solid metallic hydrogen and add further proof that it can be done, if the right means are applied. It will also likely rekindle efforts by others to be the first to reach the goal.last_img read more

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first_img Share this video Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA lorry has overturned on a major Stoke-on-Trent road this afternoon – with one man taken to hospital as a result. The accident took place on Reginald Mitchell Way between the A500 D Road (Kidsgrove / Tunstall Turn Off) and A50 High Street (Sandyford). The road was fully closed while emergency services clean up a diesel spillage but has now reopened. The accident is on the stretch between the A500 and the roundabout by Wickes, according to traffic data company INRIX. The vehicle is believed to have overturned shortly before 2.30pm this afternoon – and police, paramedics and firefighters are at the scene. A Staffordshire Police spokeswoman said: “At 2.27pm today we received a report of an overturned lorry on Reginald Mitchell Way. Officers are currently at the scene, alongside colleagues from the Fire and Rescue Service and Ambulance Service. “One lane is currently closed due to a diesel spillage, but recovery has been arranged. Click for Sound The video will start in 8Cancel Play now Watch Next We pay for stories! Send your videos to video@trinitymirror.com Reader Shannon Rebecca Wright sent us the above video of the accident. Read MoreLive: News, traffic and weather updates for North Staffordshire & South Cheshire on Monday, April 16 Click to playTap to playcenter_img Video will play in  The overturned lorry (video by Shannon Rebecca Wright) Video Loading Video Unavailable Watch again The stretch of road the lorry has overturned on (Image: Inrix) “Drivers are advised to avoid the area if possible.” A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokeswoman said one person had been taken to hospital following the accident, although we have no details in their injuries at this stage. The spokeswoman said: “We were called just before 2.30pm to the roundabout near Wickes on Reginald Mitchell Way to reports of an overturned lorry. “One ambulance was on scene and we conveyed one patient, a man, to Royal Stoke University Hospital.” Want to keep up to date with the latest traffic and travel news?Each day Stoke-on-Trent Live journalists bring you the latest news on the roads and railways across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire, South Cheshire and further afield to help keep you on the move. For the very latest updates on roads including the M6, A500, A50 and more, visit our dedicated traffic and travel news channel here. We also run a live news feed each weekday, which you can access on our website’s homepage from 7am to 9pm from Monday to Friday. And for more as-we-get-it updates on the roads across the region and beyond, join The Sentinel’s traffic and travel Facebook group here.last_img read more

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