first_imgGo back to the enewsletterLuxury cruise line Cunard has launched its record 54-day season Down Under by unveiling a dramatic wardrobe makeover for its famous bell boys in collaboration with iconic Australian brand, R.M.Williams.Debuting on board Cunard’s Queen Elizabeth in Melbourne this week, R.M.Williams’ fresh take on the cruise line’s classic red and black bell boy uniforms is one of a series of exciting partnerships with Australian companies designed to celebrate a two-month season in local waters for the stylish 2081-guest ship.Presenting the uniforms, Cunard President Simon Palethorpe also revealed the cruise line’s plans to base Queen Elizabeth in Australian waters for an unprecedented 118 days over the 2020-21 summer, with Melbourne once again set to feature as a key homeport in the ship’s program.Image Credit: James D MorganIt will be the third consecutive summer deployment Down Under for the popular Queen Elizabeth, further building on its current 54-day season of cruises from Melbourne and Sydney and its scheduled 101-day season over the 2019-20 summer.Marking the start of Cunard’s first ever series of sailings from Melbourne as well as the longest Australian season yet for one of its current fleet of Queens, the cruise line launched partnerships with award-winning Melbourne whisky distillery STARWARD and acclaimed performance troupe Australian Dance Theatre, in addition to R.M.Williams and legendary Australian hat maker Akubra.Image Credit: James D MorganA first for the 179-year-old cruise line, the new seven-piece Aussie bell boy uniforms were designed by R.M.Williams – which boasts actor Daniel Craig and US President Bill Clinton among its star-studded clientele – with Australia’s warm summer weather in mind.Celebrating Cunard’s trademark colours of red, black and gold, the stylish ensemble features a red tailored jacket with gold nautical buttons and black cuffs, 100 per cent cotton black twill pants, handmade leather belts and R.M.Williams’ most recognised boots, The Craftsman, in striking Cunard red.The bell boys will also swap their traditional pillbox hats for custom-made brimmed Akubras, ideal for keeping off the summer sun.“Over the past decade we’ve seen a marked increase in the number of Australians travelling with Cunard so we wanted to acknowledge the importance of this market not only with Queen Elizabeth’s record deployment Down Under this year, but also with some groundbreaking partnerships,” Palethorpe said.He added: “We’re very excited that our bell boys are going to take on a modern Australian look while we’re based here over summer, and we think local cruisers will love the opportunity to enjoy a special drop of whisky and some extraordinary Australian dance performances during the season.”Image Credit: James D MorganThe arrival of Queen Elizabeth in Melbourne also marks the return of a very special piece of cargo – The Seafarer, a 225-litre barrel of Australian STARWARD whisky. Aged for two years at STARWARD’s Port Melbourne distillery, the barrel was loaded onto Queen Elizabeth last February and has spent 12 months travelling 95,000 nautical miles around the globe on a unique ‘maturation journey’ to create a first-of-its-kind single malt whisky.Australians can experience this rare whisky for themselves on board Queen Elizabeth during her season Down Under, and at STARWARD’s Port Melbourne distillery.Cunard’s fourth partnership will come to life when performers from the Australian Dance Theatre (ADT) take to the stage for the cruise line’s first special event cruise Down Under – a six-night roundtrip cruise to Tasmania departing Melbourne on March 12, 2019.Image Credit: James D MorganDuring the voyage the ADT troupe will perform in their first-ever bespoke performance at sea, featuring two exclusive shows adapted from their latest work, The Beginning of Nature. Guests will be able to polish their own dance moves with movement classes led by ADT performers and the group’s Artistic Director, Garry Stewart, as part of a special itinerary building on the ship’s new wellbeing services.Go back to the enewsletterlast_img read more

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first_imgBritish Airways-owner IAG (ICAG.L) is facing a record $230 million (183.4 million pounds) fine for the theft of data from 500,000 customers from its website last year under tough new data-protection rules policed by the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). Reporting by Paul Sandle and James Davey in London and Noor Zainab Hussain in Bengaluru; Editing by Arun Koyyur/Keith Weir  LONDON (Reuters) The ICO proposed a penalty of £183.4 million, or 1.5% of British Airways’ 2017 worldwide turnover, for the hack, which it said exposed poor security arrangements at the airline.BA indicated that it planned to appeal against the fine, the product of European data protection rules, called GDPR, that came into force in 2018. They allow regulators to fine companies up to 4% of their global turnover for data-protection failures.The attack involved traffic to the British Airways website being diverted to a fraudulent site, where customer details such as log in, payment card and travel booking details as well as names and addresses were harvested, the ICO said.Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said: “People’s personal data is just that – personal.“When an organisation fails to protect it from loss, damage or theft it is more than an inconvenience. That’s why the law is clear – when you are entrusted with personal data you must look after it.”BA’s chairman and chief executive Alex Cruz said he was “surprised and disappointed” by the proposed penalty.“British Airways responded quickly to a criminal act to steal customers’ data,” he said.“We have found no evidence of fraud/fraudulent activity on accounts linked to the theft.”Willie Walsh, CEO of parent company IAG, said BA would be making representations to the ICO about the proposed fine.“We intend to take all appropriate steps to defend the airline’s position vigorously, including making any necessary appeals,” he said.Shares in IAG fell 0.8% to 452.7 pence by 0810 GMT.Analyst Gerald Khoo at broker Liberum said the proposed fine equated to about 9 pence per IAG share.“While IAG has more than adequate liquidity to cover the fine (Dec 2018 cash 3.8 billion euros, total liquidity 6.3 billion euros), the penalty is still substantial,” he said.The ICO, which could impose fines up to 500,000 under previous rules, had also investigated BA on behalf of other European regulators.The ICO fined Facebook 500,000 pounds in 2018 for serious breaches of data protection law. It said the penalty would have “inevitably have been significantly higher under GDPR.”center_img London best pest control last_img read more

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