Physicists demonstrate a time cloaking device

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Physicists scale up invisibility cloaks using natural crystals © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: Physicists demonstrate a time cloaking device (2011, July 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-physicists-cloaking-device.html Unlike other proven cloaking devices that work by bending light around objects, this cloaking device works by compressing the light passing through the optical cable by means of a special silicon lens that causes some of the light passing through it to speed up and some to slow down, which causes the waves to divide. Another lens, a little farther up the cable then causes the light to be put back together. The result is light emerging from the end of the cable that appears to be unaltered, which means, for the little bit of space between the lenses, things have or could have gone on, with no record of it occurring.While it appears the new technology might be used for signal processing application, it appears equally likely it might be used for both good and bad purpose as well. For example, if coded messages could be hidden in a series of these cloaks, it would be mighty difficult to intercept them, making for very secure communications. On the other hand, it also seems logical to conclude that such a hidden time lag, if it could be made to pulse on and off, over and over as a data is passing through, could be used to intercept data without there being a record of it.In the demonstration, the reason that creating a temporary gap in the light in a fiber optic cable is considered to be cloaking time is because of the type of duality that exists between space and time in electromagnetic theory, which says in short, that diffraction and dispersion are symmetric in spacetime.If only the technology could be expanded to real world size, you could step between two lenses, and do anything you wish, and it would never be recorded in time; for the rest of the world, it would never have happened. Alas, it’s not to be however, the researchers point out that they don’t expect the technique could ever produce a gap that lasts any longer than 120 microseconds, not nearly enough time to do anything worth hiding.center_img Physicists Moti Fridman and colleagues at Cornell University have successfully demonstrated a so-called time cloaking device that is able to “hide” time for 15 trillionths of a second. In a paper published on arXiv, the researchers describe how they were able to cause light passing through a fiber optic cable to compress, than decompress, causing a hole or void to exist, long enough for there to be a lag between the two. More information: Demonstration of temporal cloaking, arXiv:1107.2062v1AbstractRecent research has uncovered a remarkable ability to manipulate and control electromagnetic fields to produce effects such as perfect imaging and spatial cloaking. To achieve spatial cloaking, the index of refraction is manipulated to flow light from a probe around an object in such a way that a “hole” in space is created, and it remains hidden. Alternatively, it may be desirable to cloak the occurrence of an event over a finite time period, and the idea of temporal cloaking was proposed in which the dispersion of the material is manipulated in time to produce a “time hole” in the probe beam to hide the occurrence of the event from the observer. This approach is based on accelerating and slowing down the front and rear parts, respectively, of the probe beam to create a well controlled temporal gap in which the event occurs so the probe beam is not modified in any way by the event. The probe beam is then restored to its original form by the reverse manipulation of the dispersion. Here we present an experimental demonstration of temporal cloaking by applying concepts from the time-space duality between diffraction and dispersive broadening. We characterize the performance of our temporal cloak by detecting the spectral modification of a probe beam due to an optical interaction while the cloak is turned off and on and show that the event is observed when the cloak is turned off but becomes undetectable when the cloak is turned on. These results are a significant step toward the development of full spatio-temporal cloaking. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Is a classical electrodynamics law incompatible with special relativity

first_img However, Mansuripur’s bold claim of a paradox with the Lorentz law has generated some intense criticism. One critic, Daniel Vanzella, a physics professor at the University of Sao Paulo in Sao Carlos, Brazil, has submitted a comment to Physical Review Letters arguing that the Lorentz law is perfectly compatible with special relativity, and that Mansuripur has misunderstood relativistic mechanics. The only paradox, Vanzella says, is why the high-ranking journal accepted the paper in the first place.Charge-magnet paradoxThe basis of Mansuripur’s argument is that the Lorentz law violates special relativity by producing different results in different reference frames. According to special relativity, the laws of physics – including electromagnetism – must be the same in all non-accelerating reference frames. He describes a scenario in which a magnetic dipole and a nearby electric charge are located a certain distance apart. When the magnet and the electric charge are at rest, no net force is exchanged between the two. This is because static electric charges only produce electric fields (to which the magnet is oblivious), and static magnets only produce magnetic fields (to which the static electric charge is oblivious). Both the Lorentz law and the Einstein-Laub version give the same result: the magnet experiences neither a force nor a torque from the electric charge.However, the Lorentz law gives a different result when a stationary observer watches the magnet and electric charge in a moving reference frame. Here, the observer sees the moving electric charge exert a torque on the moving magnet, causing the magnet to rotate as it tries to align itself with the electric field. The presence of this torque differs from the observation in the stationary reference frame where there is no torque.On the other hand, the Einstein-Laub formula, when combined with a corresponding torque formula, gives zero torque value for observers in both reference frames, complying with special relativity.The Lorentz law’s incompatibility with special relativity is not its only shortcoming, according to Mansuripur. Another equally important issue is the long-standing problem of “hidden momentum,” in which he shows that the Lorentz law fails to conserve momentum in certain situations involving magnetic media. In contrast, the Einstein-Laub equations show complete consistency with the conservation laws. For Mansuripur, this evidence indicates that the Einstein-Laub formula should be considered as a better way to understand classical electrodynamics. (Phys.org) — The laws of classical electromagnetism that were developed in the 19th century are the same laws that scientists use today. They include Maxwell’s four equations along with the Lorentz law, which describes the force exerted by electric and magnetic fields on charged particles. But Masud Mansuripur, a professor of Optical Sciences at The University of Arizona in Tucson, is now arguing that the Lorentz law of force is incompatible with special relativity and momentum conservation, and should be abandoned. In a recent issue of Physical Review Letters, he has suggested replacing the Lorentz law with a more general expression of electromagnetic force density, such as one developed by Albert Einstein and Jakob Laub in 1908. Best yet test of Lorentz invariance “This work provides a firm basis for all calculations of force, torque, momentum and angular momentum whenever electromagnetic fields (microwave, light, etc.) interact with material media,” Mansuripur told Phys.org. “The electromagnetic momentum and angular momentum become well-defined universal entities (i.e., the Abraham momentum), the need for ‘hidden momentum’ disappears, and satisfaction of conservation laws as well as conformity with special relativity are guaranteed.He explains that, during the past century, there has been a proliferation of equations for force and torque in the scientific literature, with scientists using several different formulas for the electromagnetic momentum. “My paper fixes the foundational equations and allows researchers to compare their experimental results against a single, well-defined theory,” he said.Quantum natureAccording to Mansuripur, the underlying reason for the difference between the Lorentz law and Einstein-Laub formula involves how each equation mathematically describes the quantum nature of electromagnetic fields and media. For its part, the Lorentz law depicts electric and magnetic dipoles as pairs of positive and negative charges or stable loops of current that interact with electromagnetic fields in terms of free and bound charges and currents. In contrast, the Einstein-Laub formula describes material media as spatio-temporal distributions of charge, current, polarization, and magnetization. Mansuripur explains why this distinction is important.“The fact that the electron orbits inside atoms and molecules are stable is a quantum-mechanical phenomenon,” he said. “Neither Maxwell’s equations nor the Lorentz law of force (and nor, for that matter, the Einstein-Laub force/torque equations) can account for the stability of the electron orbit. The fact that electrons, protons and neutrons have a magnetic moment associated with their spin angular momentum is also a relativistic quantum effect that has no explanation within classical physics. What Maxwell’s equations and the Lorentz law (or the Einstein-Laub law) do is provide formulas that describe the behavior of fields and material media as they are, without attempting to justify that behavior. The Lorentz law, however, simplifies the underlying physics by assuming that electric and magnetic dipoles can be treated as distributions of ordinary electrical charge and current. In contrast, the Einstein-Laub equation and the accompanying torque equation treat free charge, free current, electric dipoles, and magnetic dipoles as four distinct constituents of material media.“So, for example, the fact that a magnetic dipole is associated with something resembling a loop of current is a quantum mechanical effect. The Lorentz law does not ignore this fact, but it takes the resemblance to a current loop too far, treating the magnetic dipole as if it were actually a loop of ordinary current. In contrast, the Einstein-Laub formula acknowledges that magnetic dipoles exist as distinct entities – what makes them distinct is quantum mechanics, of course, but Einstein-Laub does not attempt to justify the existence of these dipoles or their nature. The Einstein-Laub formulas then provide a ‘recipe’ for calculating the force and torque on these dipoles, which turns out to be different from the ‘recipe’ provided by the Lorentz law.”No paradox?One critic of Mansuripur’s ideas, Vanzella, thinks that the paper is so flawed that it should not have been published at all. In his comment submitted to the journal, Vanzella points out that the Lorentz force can be put in a covariant form. In special relativity, a covariant law cannot lead to incompatible descriptions of the same phenomenon in different inertial reference frames. He explains that Mansuripur has incorrectly used relativistic mechanics and ignored a hidden momentum that makes the Lorentz formula predict a torque in one reference frame but not another. “This has blown way out of proportion,” Vanzella said. “Let me begin by stating the most important point: there is no incompatibility between the Lorentz force and special relativity. This is not a matter of opinion: any relativist knows that this is impossible for any specially-covariant law (as is the Lorentz force). By construction, a specially-covariant law is compatible with special relativity. This means that if it leads to a satisfactory description of a phenomenon in one inertial frame, then it leads to consistent descriptions in any inertial frame; there are no paradoxes.”He added that apparent paradoxes appear frequently when dealing with special relativity, but these paradoxes are actually due to simply missing or overlooking part of the relativistic argument. He says that a very similar “paradox” to the charge-magnet paradox, called the Trouton-Noble paradox, was presented and resolved more than 100 years ago. “In this particular case, using a current loop in a perfectly-conducting ring to model the magnet’s magnetic moment, one has to use special relativity to show that, even when the ring is at rest, the total momentum of the system is not zero (when subject to an external electric field),” he explained. “This momentum has been termed ‘hidden’ in the literature and this has led to some confusion, but let me stress that it is real momentum. Mansuripur is missing the point that this momentum is not an ad hoc invention only to solve paradoxes; its existence is forced upon us (upon Nature, actually) due to the principles of special relativity alone. In my comment I do not postulate the existence of this momentum. I simply use special relativity to calculate it; no additional hypothesis other than special relativity and the Lorentz force. Therefore, when Mansuripur dismisses this ‘hidden’ momentum he is doing exactly what I said is needed to arrive at a paradox: missing or overlooking part of the relativistic argument.”Despite his strong disagreement with Mansuripur, he emphasized that his criticism does not suggest anything against Mansuripur’s scientific credibility.“Please note that I don’t think that Mansuripur not knowing the solution of the ‘charge-magnet paradox’ (or not understanding the given solution) is that bad,” Vanzella said. “Special relativity is certainly not his expertise and confuses a lot of people, even physicists.”He also added that he’s not necessarily arguing that the Lorentz law must be the correct law of force, either, but just that special relativity cannot be used to testify against it. The question of which law is correct is an experimental issue. Still, he’s adamant that there is no paradox in this situation.“I wouldn’t even call Mansuripur’s idea ‘controversial,’” he said. “Would you call ‘controversial’ the idea that the Earth is flat? It is simply and provably wrong (I mean the claim that the Lorentz force is incompatible with special relativity).”In a response to Vanzella’s comment, also submitted to Physical Review Letters, Mansuripur has stuck to his original argument, explaining that there is no need to introduce hidden momentum, and that the Trouton-Noble paradox was subtly but significantly different than the charge-magnet paradox.Future of Einstein-LaubDespite the advantages of Einstein-Laub formula, Mansuripur acknowledges that it is not without its own problems. In 1979, physicist Iver Brevik performed an extensive review of the Einstein-Laub formula and other possible candidates for an energy-momentum tensor for the electromagnetic field. In some of the experiments, the Einstein-Laub formula did not match actual observations as closely as another formula, the Helmholtz force equation. However, Mansuripur argues that, due to the potential significance of this idea, the contrary evidence deserves a closer examination.“My colleagues and I are currently trying to identify situations where the distinction between the Lorentz law and the Einstein-Laub formulation is unambiguous, then try to conduct experiments to determine which law is operative in such situations,” he said. “Personally, I don’t attach much significance to the historical evidence against the Einstein-Laub formulation as reviewed in the paper by Brevik. The experiments were all electrostatic experiments, involving the flow of some dielectric fluid into a capacitor. The theoretical methods used to analyze the problem were extremely confusing; many approximations were made, and the Einstein-Laub formula itself was never used directly; instead they used a stress tensor associated with Einstein-Laub, which I have shown elsewhere to be incorrect.Mansuripur also plans to further investigate what he thinks has been a much overlooked distinction between the two formulas: a term that describes the force density of an electric field acting on the polarization density of a material medium. Whereas the Lorentz law uses –(del.P)E, the Einstein-Laub formula uses (P.del)E. Although the two formulations give exactly the same total force and total torque on any solid object, differences emerge when dealing with soft objects.“If applied to soft objects such as biological cells under intense illumination or droplets of oil or water in optical tweezers, the two formulas give different force and torque ‘distributions’ throughout the object,” he said. “This difference in force/torque distribution will then manifest itself in different deformations of the object under intense illumination. Our near-term goal, therefore, is to look for deformations of soft objects in optical tweezers experiments. A long-term goal is to look for observable differences between Lorentz and Einstein-Laub in magnetic materials.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Charge-magnet paradox: the point electric charge q and the point magnetic dipole to its right are separated by distance d in the x’y’z’ frame. An observer in the x’y’z’ frame sees no torque, but a stationary observer in the xyz frame watching the x’y’z’ system move with constant velocity along the z axis sees the moving electric charge exert a torque on the moving magnet. Image credit: Mansuripur. ©2012 American Physical Society More information: Masud Mansuripur, “Trouble with the Lorentz Law of Force: Incompatibility with Special Relativity and Momentum Conservation.” Physical Review Letters 108, 193901 (2012). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.193901 Explore further Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Is a classical electrodynamics law incompatible with special relativity? (2012, May 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-05-classical-electrodynamics-law-incompatible-special.html Journal information: Physical Review Letterslast_img read more

Researchers create methylation maps of Neanderthals and Denisovans compare them to modern

first_img Explore further (Phys.org) —A team of Israeli, Spanish and German researchers has for the first time created a map of gene expression in Neanderthals and Denisovans and has compared them with modern humans. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they applied epigentics to the study of our two closest known ancestors and discovered variations that might account for their differences in body shape and susceptibility to some modern neurological diseases. More information: Reconstructing the DNA Methylation Maps of the Neandertal and the Denisovan, Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.1250368ABSTRACTAncient DNA sequencing has recently provided high-coverage archaic human genomes. However, the evolution of epigenetic regulation along the human lineage remains largely unexplored. We reconstructed the full DNA methylation maps of the Neandertal and the Denisovan by harnessing the natural degradation processes of methylated and unmethylated cytosines. Comparing these ancient methylation maps to those of present-day humans, we identified ~2000 differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Particularly, we found substantial methylation changes in the HOXD cluster that may explain anatomical differences between archaic and present-day humans. Additionally, we found that DMRs are significantly more likely to be associated with diseases. This study provides insight into the epigenetic landscape of our closest evolutionary relatives and opens a window to explore the epigenomes of extinct species. A Neanderthal skeleton, left, compared with a modern human skeleton. Credit: American Museum of Natural History © 2014 Phys.org Journal information: Sciencecenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scientists know that it’s not just our DNA structure that determines how we look and what we’re capable of doing, there’s another factor involved—the expression of our genes—they can be turned on or off at some point, allowing or preventing certain traits from developing. This process is known as DNA methylation—where methyl group chemicals attach to DNA and prevent them from behaving as they would otherwise. In this new effort, the researchers looked at methylation in Neanderthals and Denisovans to learn more about how they might have been different from us.Studying methylation in preserved fossils involves noting the way the methyl chemical cytosine decays over long periods of time. Unmethylated cytosines decay to one type of chemical while unmethylated cyctones decay to another. By measuring the amounts of the two resultant chemicals found in fossilized bone fragments, the researchers were able to create methylation maps of Neanderthals and Denisovans, which they then compared with similar maps for modern humans.The comparisons revealed differences in approximately 2000 different regions, though one in particular stood out—an HoxD cluster that prior research has shown plays an important role in the development of body structure—a finding that could help explain the shorter, stouter limbs (and other features) of our extinct cousins. Interestingly, the team also found that some of the highly methylated regional areas that appear in modern humans do not appear in either Neanderthals or Denisovans, regions that have been associated with neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and autism—a finding that may help shed some light on their source.Unfortunately, the maps created by the research team are still incomplete, they only had a few bone fragments to work with—they’re hoping future studies (and fossil finds) will reveal more. In the meantime, they plan to conduct similar work on other species, such as horses, to help reveal the types of methylation that occurred as they were domesticated. Citation: Researchers create methylation maps of Neanderthals and Denisovans, compare them to modern humans (2014, April 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-methylation-neanderthals-denisovans-modern-humans.html New insights into why humans are more susceptible to cancer and other diseaseslast_img read more

Researchers successfully transform liquid deuterium into a metal

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Pair claim they have turned hydrogen to metal Citation: Researchers successfully transform liquid deuterium into a metal (2015, June 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-06-successfully-liquid-deuterium-metal.html More information: Direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium, Science 26 June 2015: Vol. 348 no. 6242 pp. 1455-1460. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa7471ABSTRACTEighty years ago, it was proposed that solid hydrogen would become metallic at sufficiently high density. Despite numerous investigations, this transition has not yet been experimentally observed. More recently, there has been much interest in the analog of this predicted metallic transition in the dense liquid, due to its relevance to planetary science. Here, we show direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium. Experimental determination of the location of this transition provides a much-needed benchmark for theory and may constrain the region of hydrogen-helium immiscibility and the boundary-layer pressure in standard models of the internal structure of gas-giant planets.Press release (Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at Sandia National Labs working with another team from the University of Rostock in Germany, has succeeded in squeezing liquid deuterium into becoming what appeared to be a metal. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their new technique which has brought researchers closer to the ultimate goal of creating solid metallic hydrogen. Schematic phase diagram of hydrogen. The figure shows the four known solid phases I to IV and two observed liquid phases, together with the predicted atomic liquid. Blue rings imply rotating quantum molecules, wiggly lines imply entangled rotor state, and solid bonds are where calculation shows a covalent bond. Credit: Science 26 June 2015: Vol. 348 no. 6242 pp. 1429-1430. DOI: 10.1126/science.aac6626center_img Journal information: Science © 2015 Phys.org Explore further Back in 1935, a pair of researchers, Hillard Bell Huntington and Eugene Wigner first showed via theory that it should be possible to create solid metallic hydrogen—all that was needed was sufficient pressure. Since that time, various teams have attempted to prove that theory correct, but to date, none have been successful. In this new effort, the research team has developed a new way to add pressure that does not cause other problems. Other than pride, the only real benefit of pursuing the objective is the information that can be gleaned from such efforts, information that might prove useful in studying other planets, for example—it could shed light on the forces necessary to produce observed phenomenon.Up till now, the technique used to pressurize hydrogen, has been based on squeezing samples of it between two diamond tips—such experiments have shown that it is possible to get compounds rich in hydrogen to become metal-like.In this new effort, the researchers noted that using the dual diamond tip approach was unlikely to result in achieving the ultimate goal due to the problem of sample materials becoming too reactive. They chose to go another route, making use of the massive Sandia Z machine—it is capable of creating magnetic fields up to 20 mega gauss—they first pressurized a sample of liquid deuterium (a hydrogen isotope) then caused a jolt of current from the Z machine to move through an electrode, which in turn hit the front of the container holding the deuterium—that caused a shockwave to move through the sample, condensing it further. As the material was condensed, the researchers measured how well the sample reflected light, a common means for identifying a metal. As the sample was condensed, it moved from a transparent state, to one that was reflective. This, the team claims, shows that the material clearly moved from an insulator to a metal.The results by this new team are the closest yet to creating solid metallic hydrogen and add further proof that it can be done, if the right means are applied. It will also likely rekindle efforts by others to be the first to reach the goal.last_img read more

Chinese company announces development of graphene electronic paper

first_img Explore further (Phys.org)—Chinese based Guangzhou OED Technologies (makers of O-paper displays), in collaboration with another unidentified Chinese company has announced that they have developed what they are claiming is the “the world’s first graphene electronic paper.” In the announcement, the companies also claim that the product is a breakthrough that will bring e-paper to a new level. Graphene, is of course, a single layer of carbon bound together in a hexagon pattern. Its impressive conductivity properties have made it the subject of much research by many individuals and organizations around the world over the past few years. Now, in this new effort, the group at OED claims to have developed a graphene material that is suitable for use in making e-paper. Doing so, they also claim, allows for creating screens that are more bendable and that are also brighter because they will be able to display light with more intensity. They also suggest that because the end product will be carbon based, it should be cheaper to manufacture than current e-paper products which are based on metal indium. Thus far, the new material has not been publicly demonstrated, and it is still not clear how available products will be even after they move into production next year as promised. Despite advances, such as those made by engineers at MIT last year, it is still not clear if it will be possible to mass produce such a product in a defect-free manner. Also not clear is if the new material will be sold in partnership with other companies with a high profile in marketing e-readers, such as Amazon’s Kindle device.If the new e-paper proves to be as advertised, it could mark a major shift in e-reader technology—graphene, as is noted in the announcement, is a mere 0.335 nanometers thick, which would mean thinner displays, less weight, more durability and of course, much more flexibility. It seems possible that such a material could usher in a paradigm shift—from e-readers that look like tablet computers, to e-paper that looks like old-school paper, but is animated, similar to that seen in the Harry Potter movies. Or, as also mentioned in the announcement, it could lead finally to wearable smart devices. Credit: AlexanderAlUS/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 A new way to make higher quality bilayer graphenecenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2016 Phys.org Citation: Chinese company announces development of graphene electronic paper (2016, May 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-chinese-company-graphene-electronic-paper.htmllast_img read more

Treat for book lovers in city

first_imgBook lovers in the Capital now have reason to rejoice. The biannual event has just been converted into an annual event. World Book Fair 2013 began in the Capital on Monday with book-lovers thronging the exhibition. The fair was inaugurated by the Minister of State for HRD, Dr Shashi Tharoor. MP Karan Singh and French Ambassador Francois Richier were also present at the inaugural ceremony. The week-long fair being held at the Pragati Maidan displays books of all kinds and genres in both national and international category. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The fair has nearly 1,100 exhibitors from 28 countries exhibiting books in about 2,100 stalls. Stalls have been set up by foreign publishers from countries like the US, Nepal, Turkey, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabia, the UK, Singapore, Sri Lanka and South Korea. The book fair is organised by the National Book Trust (NBT) and co-organised by India Trade Promotion Organisation.It has around 200 participants and the theme of the fair this year is Indigenous Voices: Mapping India’s Folk and Tribal Literature where France is the guest country. Keeping the theme in mind, the fair has a special exhibition of books on various aspects of folk and tribal literature, culture, exhibits of art and crafts, workshops and panel discussions. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘France is the guest country of honour with focus on its publishing industry and its contemporary literature through a large contingent of publishers, authors and scholars,’ said MA Sikander, director, National Book Trust. ‘The main aim of the organisers is to captivate children. We wish to sensitise and improve the reading habits of youngsters. To keep them interested and involved, the organisers have made a children and youth pavilion,’ he further said. There are discussions and special sections for youth and children. Many NGOs, colleges, schools and government institutions are participating and organising various activities for youngsters and children to promote book culture among them.A special inclusion for e-books has also been made where the developers, publishers, and content providers are displaying their e-books. For the first time, NBT has set up four author corners in the fair where more than 75 eminent authors in English, Hindi and other Indian languages will hold reading sessions and interact with readers.DETAILAt: Pragati MaidanOn Till: 10 FebruaryTimings: 10 am- 7 pmlast_img read more

More drama less love this Valentine

first_imgCome and witness the two plays called The Plaza Suite and Ek The Bhoot. Two different genres which vouch to take you on an emotional rush ride. Produced by Curtain Call productions, The Plaza Suite is directed by Vishesh Dhuria and Ek The Bhoot by Manil Mayank Mishra.Categorised as a Rom-Com, The Plaza Suite is composed of three acts, each involving different characters but all set in Suite 719 of New York city’s Plaza hotel. ‘It’s a tribute to Valentine’s day from my end. I am hugely inspired by Neil Simons stories. This story is also written by him. It further portrays all sorts of emotions involved in relationships. The story follows how three couples undergoing different conflicts meet on a common ground in the suite and how they find a vent to their personal issues,’ says Vishesh. The second play, Ek Tha Bhoot is a satire with a message on how God is is both the creator and the caretaker of the universe, but that doesn’t mean that human beings should just leave everything in his hands. They too have to do their part because in the end, God looks after the ones who look after themselves. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘The play is adapted from Vijay Tendulkar’s Vitthala. We have taken the entire ideology and contemporarised it for the viability of the audience’s understanding. Though the morality bent and lesson remains the same. The major highlight being the dichotomy between the existence of god and ghosts good vs evil debate is seen in a new light. Finally I have tried to re-root and reinvent the conceptual understanding of the existing good and bad in the  society which would take a space in people’s hearts,’ says Manil.When: 14 FebruaryWhere: Akshara Theatrelast_img read more

Soon Howrah to get Khel City

first_imgKolkata: In a bid to improve infrastructure for sports activities, Khel City will be developed at Dumurjola in Howrah.While addressing the administrative review meeting in Howrah on Thursday, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee stated the need of setting up another cricket stadium as there is only one in the state and there is demand for one more. The cricket stadiumwill also come up in the Khel City.Firhad Hakim, the state Urban Development and Municipal Affairs minister, was also present in the meeting. He said: “Survey has been conducted and a plan has also been chalked out to set up the Khel City. Spot visit has also been carried out with the Mayor.” Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsHe further said: “All aspects of sports activities will be brought under one umbrella in the Khel City. There are some old buildings. Residents of the buildings will be rehabilitated to another place and HIT will be carrying out the task.””With setting up of the city, there will be infrastructure for cricket, football and other sports including swimming. Moreover, there will be a separate arena for players and sportsmen,” he said, adding that with development of the infrastructure, people from outside will also start flowing in. So, there will also be a hotel for their accommodation. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedHe further said that an indoor stadium is also coming up here and it is almost complete.The Chief Minister said in this connection that former captain of the Indian cricket team Sourav Ganguly, who is at present the president of Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB), came to meet her and gave proposal of carrying out sports activities.”The CAB wants another stadium and it would come up at Dumurjola. We must allow the same as there is only one cricket stadium in the state,” said the Chief Minister.It may be mentioned that the Mamata Banerjee government had given a 15 acre land at New Town to All India Football Federation (AIFF), to set up the National Centre for Excellence in Football. This came after the FIFA Under-17 Football World Cup.Hakim said that he will be holding discussion with Sourav Ganguly, to chalk out a plan to develop the cricket stadium.last_img read more

Friendship hinges on individual personality

first_imgOne’s personality decides whether you would strike a chord with a stranger, says an interesting study.Those who score low on neuroticism — the personality dimension related to anxiety and self-consciousness — are more likely to open the channel of interaction in response to eye contact, the findings showed.On the other hand, those who are more anxious and self-conscious may find eye contacts discomforting and may even experience high levels of anxiety when they are the focus of someone’s gaze. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“Our findings indicate that people do not only feel different when they are the centre of attention but that their brain reactions also differ,” said corresponding author Jari Hietanen from the University of Tampere in Finland.For some, eye contact tunes the brain into a mode that increases the likelihood of initiating an interaction with other people.“For others, the effect of eye contact may decrease this likelihood,” Hietanen added.Eye contact plays a crucial role when people initiate interaction with other people. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIf people look each other in the eye, they automatically send a signal that their attention is focused on the other person.However, in some individuals, eye contact may also trigger brain activity associated with avoidance motivation.In this study, the researchers set out to study what lies underneath these individual psychological differences. Does personality modulate how a person reacts to eye contact? Can this difference be measured by brain activity? “We conducted an experiment where the participants’ electrical brain activity was recorded while they were looking at another person who was either making eye contact or had her gaze averted to the side,” said researcher Helen Uusberg from the University of Tartu in Estonia.The results showed that personality does indeed modulate the way one’s brain reacts to attention from another individual. The study appeared in the journal Neuropsychologia.last_img read more

Skeleton of woman dogs found in Kolkata flat

first_imgIn a case that could give a thriller a run for its money, the city police investigating the death of a septuagenarian in a fire in his home on Thursday stumbled on a man living with the skeletons of his elder sister and two dogs for the past six months.The police investigating a fire on the second floor of 3, Robinson Street in the heart of the city found the charred body of 77-year-old Arabindo De, owner of the house, from a bathroom on Wednesday night. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJI”Following last night’s incident, we had posted two constables outside De’s flat. Seeing them, De’s son Partho (45) reacted abnormally,”  said Pallab Kanti Ghosh, special additional commissioner of police (crime).The police had initially thought his behaviour was due to the grief of losing his father. But when they questioned Partho, he narrated a bizarre story of his father storing his sister’s skeleton and those of two pet dogs inside the house, Ghosh said. Also Read – Health remains key challenge in India’s development: KovindThe police conducted a search and found three skeletons allegedly belonging to his elder sister Debjani (50) and two dogs from one room and a suicide note purportedly written by the father from another room.The note dated June 8 this year said none was responsible for his death. Ghosh said that during interrogation Partho told the police that Debjani was depressed after the death of two dogs last year and had stopped eating. She died six months ago.”We found ample dry food near the skeletons, which Partho said he was feeding his sister and the dogs,” the ACP said.”We believe Partho could not accept his sister’s death and did not cremate her body. We have sent him to a mental hospital. We are taking medical help to ascertain whether he is mentally stable or not,” Ghosh said. No case has been registered in this connection.last_img read more