In Your Neighbourhood

first_img Exceptional score stunning win Mandeville’s best-known pistol shooter, Orville Henriques, showed he was in good shape to compete at next weekend’s US Nationals as he blew away his clubmates in a tournament dubbed ‘US Nationals Send Off”. Henriques, who is looking to better his current fourth-place ranking among the best Jamaicans who compete internationally, tallied 606 points from seven stages, a whopping 195 more than second-place Sue Ann Henriques, who shot at 67 per cent. It was the highest margin of victory by percentage in a major match at the Manchester Rifle and Pistol Club. Owen Campbell, who denied Henriques a clean sweep of the stages by winning Stage Seven – valued at 100 points – was third with 382. Ellsworth Dixon and Thomas Jones completed the top five. Desmond Prince, who finished sixth at 53 per cent, was the most striking lower-placed result. Prince, who took up shooting seriously only last year, was producing his best finish among more experienced shooters in a major match. The US Nationals will be staged from October 9-10 in Frostproof, Florida. Central Manchester netball finals loom 12 confirmed for Portmore Business House football Peter Bunting Football League round-up The Gleaner advanced to the second round of the Business House three-on-three Division One basketball league when they defeated former champions Grace Canning 27-24 at the Stadium Courts recently. The Gleaner qualified for the next round by virtue of having won seven matches as against losing five. After losing their top player, Omar Wolfe, at the start of the season, The Gleaner struggled in the early matches, but the players gradually improved and with their captain, Keneil Allen, coming up big with three pointers, in recent matches, the team was able to qualify. Allen scored a game-high 12 points against Grace, whose top player, Andrew Goulbourne, replied with 11. The Gleaner won the Division Two title in 2013 and have been campaigning in Division One since the 2014 season. Twelve teams, led by three-time defending champions Cable Pro, will compete for top honours in the Portmore Business House football competition, which kicks off next Wednesday, October 5, at the Sunshine playing field in Naggo Head, Portmore. Newcomers Digicel will have their hands full as they come up against defending champs Cable Pro at 8:30 p.m. in a game that officially kicks off the tournament. The sponsors are Institute of Sports (INSPORTS) and Charles Chocolates. Brixton FC, from Braeton Phase Three, won the inaugural Ray McIntosh six-a-side one-day football competition, with a 2-1 penalty kicks win over arch-rivals Braeton Blazers, also from Phase Three, after both teams played out a 0-0 scoreline in regulation and extra-time. Businessman Rayon McIntosh, a stalwart in the community of Braeton and sponsor of the competition, handed over the trophy and a cash award to Brixton FC at the competition’s awards ceremony. At that same function, held on Seal Avenue in Braeton Phase Three, five girls and five boys were awarded brand-new tablets for their achievements in the 2016 GSAT examinations. Before the function, there was a treat for children. Everything was sponsored by McIntosh, his wife, and his family. Henriques ready for US Nationalscenter_img Exceptional pulled off a stunning 300-299 sudden-death win over Giants as action continued in the Jamaica Domino Council Association Premier League last Sunday. In other games, Caribbean Classic whipped Naggo Head 300-218; Spit Fyah defeated Memory Lane 300-282; Jade Strikers outlasted Mechanical Strikers 300-296; Soursop Tree beat International 300-290; Braeton All Stars cut down Small Axe 300-265; Bull Bay won 300-274 over Vintage Pub; and Right Stuff crushed Highlight Strikers 300-216. Brixton FC win Ray McIntosh six-a-side football title The Gleaner advance in Business House basketball McKenzie wins Munro 6.5km walk race The final of the Central Manchester Sports Development Committee netball leagues will be hosted at the May Day High School grounds next Sunday. The day’s activity begins with the third-place match in the Junior League between Porus and Broadleaf at 2:15 p.m. The Senior League third-place play-off between the Police team and Newleigh All Stars starts at 3 p.m. The Junior League finals featuring Albion and Pear Tree gets under way at 3:45 p.m. The grand Senior final between Williamsfield and Bombay is earmarked for 4:30 p.m. As an additional attraction, fans will be treated to the football final of the Knockpatrick Division. That match will kick off at 3:30 p.m. The finalists will be determined soon. Old England stayed on course to make the play-offs of the Knockpatrick Division in the Peter Bunting Central Manchester constituency football competition, by defeating Brokenhurst 2-1. Other victors were Albion, who were 2-1 winners over Beltiro, Pear Tree, who brushed off New Vision 3-0 and Inverness, who created a major upset in outscoring Knockpatrick 3-2. Porus remained leaders in their division, blanking Bombay 3-0, while Coffee Grove and Content ended 3-3, virtually killing each other’s chances. However, it was Blue Mountain thatmade the biggest statement in this division, slamming Hope Village 6-0. In the Mandeville Division, Georges Valley spanked defending champions Hanbury 2-0, while Cedar Grove won 1-0 over Bonito Strikers. Natasha McKenzie, a Holmwood Technical High School physical education teacher, enhanced her growing reputation as the top female walker in central Jamaica by easily taking the female category of the Munro Top Rock 6.5 km walk race last Sunday. The event, which is the initiative of the Munro College Old Boys’ Association, was being held for the first time. The route began on the north end of the over 200 acres school property, going downwards into the community before asking athletes to negotiate the famous Chelsea hill, which has an elevation of over 100 metres. McKenzie’s time of 52 minutes and 18 seconds was 15 minutes better than any other female participant but was fourth overall in the men’s category. The two first places in the men’s event were taken by Munro College schoolboys Rejeanne McClymont (48 mins) and Dean Witter (50:58.39 mins). Third place went to Richard Bryan, who finished in 50:59:31 and who took the overall over-40 category. McKenzie will now look to defend her Church Teachers College 5 km title. She is a distant relative of former top road racer Linton McKenzie.last_img read more

Africans abroad keen to return – Homecoming Revolution report

first_imgMost African professionals living abroad would love to return home, and almost all retain strong links of family and friendship to their countries. These were some of the insights from a new survey by Homecoming Revolution, presented by CEO Angel Jones at the brain gain company’s Speed Meet Jozi event in Sandton on Friday 14 August. Homecoming Revolution founder and CEO Angel Jones, at left, during the Speed Meet Jozi networking event in Sandton, Johannesburg. Mary AlexanderThe Homecoming Revolution Insights Report 2015 comes out of three surveys, of Africans abroad and returned expatriates, conducted from February to May this year. It examines the key reasons Africans move abroad, what they miss most when they are there, what links them to home and the triggers that encourage them to return.Download the Homecoming Revolution Insights Report 2015Most of those surveyed – 68% – have a degree, and 66% work in a senior or executive position. Their fields are demanding: financial services, information technology, engineering, advisory services, marketing and medicine.“We really are looking at the brain drain in a serious light,” Jones said, “and it’s time that this became a brain gain.”Jones was speaking at the Johannesburg leg of the Homecoming Revolution’s Speed Meet networking sessions, regular gatherings of pan-Africans held in major global cities such as New York, London, Nairobi and Lagos.Since 2003 Homecoming Revolution has worked to bring talented South Africans back home, reversing the brain drain. In the last two years its efforts have expanded to include other sub-Saharan African countries, particularly Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda and Ghana.Jones said that in the past five years some 359 000 expat South African professionals have returned home. This has a major ripple effect on joblessness and the economy: a study Solidarity suggests that for every one skilled expatriate who returns, nine new jobs are created in the formal and informal sectors.Of the professionals surveyed for the study, 79% were from South Africa and 21% from Nigeria, Kenya and other sub-Saharan African countries. Forty-four percent were living in the United Kingdom, 13% in the US and 12% in Australia and New Zealand.Problems or opportunities?Despite potentially flourishing careers abroad, many of these professionals still saw opportunities back in Africa.“There’s a wonderful quote I heard from a homecomer recently,” Jones said. “He said, ‘I didn’t come back in spite of the problems. I came back because of the problems. Because I saw there was a problem with our electricity, I wanted to come home and create a new solar power enterprise.’“Those are the kinds of engineers we need. We need our doctors. We need our financial services people.”The stories of returning African professionals help spread the message. “What we do as Homecoming Revolution is inspire people to return home by showcasing stories of other people who have come back, and who are making a really significant difference.”Reasons to leaveJones then turned to why Africans go abroad in the first place.“Why do people leave? This is exciting to know, because the emphasis is often only on the bad stuff,” she said. “The number one reason people go away is for career reasons. And I think that’s a good thing. Travel is number two.”The third reason respondents gave for leaving was the political and economic situation in their countries, and the fourth crime and safety concerns – down one place from a previous Homecoming Revolution study.“This was a significant difference,” Jones said. “Crime has gone down, it seems, and political instability more of a hindrance.”Wanting to returnThe study then turned to the all-important question of whether migrants wanted to come back to Africa. A quarter – 26% – said no, 21% said they didn’t know, and a “whopping” 53% said yes, they wished to return home. “This was exciting,” Jones said, to applause.“And what would people say to someone thinking of returning? We’ve grouped the responses together. Things like, ‘Follow your heart. Go for it. Wish I were you.’“Seventy-one percent of Africans living abroad think the idea of returning is a very good thing. And this is something we are encouraging, on a worldwide scale. We started Homecoming Revolution to encourage South Africans to return to South Africa. For the past two-and-a-half years we have been working with Nigerians, Kenyans, Ghanaians and Ugandans abroad, encouraging them to come back.”Following your heartThe Homecoming Revolution research revealed that the strongest pull of home was emotional, “all about following you heart”. Africans mainly want to return to be close again to friends and family, a reason cited by 61% of respondents.“There really is nothing to beat the grass under your toes, having grannies and grandpas close by, having your kids know that these are their roots,” Jones said.“We see trigger points, when people get to their late twenties and early thirties. They want to get married, or just got married, or had their first or second child, and want to be home where they feel their children will understand their roots.”Lifestyle is the second reason to return, at 35%. “Our wonderful weather. The standard of living is really good here.”The third reason, cited by 31% of respondents, is a sense of belonging. “You can’t get that, no matter where you go abroad,” Jones said. “We have lots of stories of people saying, I was living abroad, but in a gilded box. I never really felt like I belonged.”Links to homeThe African diaspora still have strong personal links to home. Ninety-two percent of respondents said family and friends were their strongest link back to Africa. For 70%, visiting home kept them connected.Financial ties were also important, with 25% saying they still had money invested in their home countries, 12% remitting money and property back home, and 11% citing business connections as an important link.The main thing expats want to stay informed on is the employment market back home. “People are very keen to understand what job opportunities there are back home – 79% of them,” Jones said. “A lot of what we do is working with pan-African employers to showcase these job opportunities for people abroad.”Forty-two percent of those still abroad want to know about entrepreneurial opportunities. “We encourage people abroad to find best-practice models that work, particularly for the African story, so they can do something to create jobs back home,” Jones said.“It’s very exciting to see that 42% – this has been a sharp increase – 42% of people want to know how they can make a difference back home. In the survey we conducted a year and a half ago, this figure was sitting at around 20%. So we are seeing a lot of increased active citizenship from Africans around the world.”Jones concluded: “There is the brain drain. It does exist. But we are working hard to reverse it into a brain gain.”last_img read more

A Jukebox in the Cloud: Rhapsody Comes to the iPhone

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#news#NYT#web Rhapsody vs. SpotifyIn the US, Rhapsody is currently the only game in town when it comes to on-demand music streaming. Unlike Spotify, Rhapsody doesn’t offer an offline mode, thanks to the arcane licensing restrictions the music industry still favors, and is only available in a select number of markets in Europe at this point. Maybe later versions will feature this ability – especially given that Apple has now allowed the Spotify app into the App Store.Once Spotify launches in the US App Store, however, Rhapsody will come under a lot of pressure, especially if Rhapsody doesn’t offer offline storage at that point. Currently, Rhapsody does offer more songs (8 million vs. 4.5 million) and the prices are similar (€9.99 vs. $15).Free TrialSigning up for the free 7-day trial is easy and doesn’t require a credit card, so if you are on the fence about trying Rhapsody out, just install the app and follow the instructions from the home screen. Apple just pointed out that it doesn’t believe in music subscriptions during its annual iPod event yesterday, but depending on your listening habits, a $14.99 subscription per month might actually turn out to be a pretty good deal. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting FeaturesRhapsody has all the features you would probably want from a streaming music app. Browsing by genres, charts, or simply searching for artists and specific tracks is easy and fast. Once you have found something you like, you can also easily add it to your ‘library’ so that you can find it quickly at a later point. Rhapsody also offers radio stations based on genres or artists, similar to what the Slacker Radio and Pandora apps offer on the iPhone.One thing we especially like about the app is how easy it is to manage and create playlists. While this feature is somewhat hidden – you have to keep pressing the name of a song or album for a second or two for the right menu to pop up – it does give you the ability to create a library of songs you like and to manage playlists. We are not quite sure at what rate Rhapsody is actually streaming this music to the iPhone, but at least over Wi-Fi and the AT&T 3G network, the sound quality is quite good. frederic lardinoiscenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Rhapsody, the online streaming music service, just launched its iPhone and iPod touch app (iTunes link). While there had been some discussion about whether Apple would actually allow this ‘iTunes competitor’ on the iPhone, the approval process looks to have been relatively smooth for Rhapsody. The app feels very similar to Apple’s own iPod app. From within the app, you can search Rhapsody’s library of 8 million tracks, surf genres, create playlists, or find new music released this week. Overall, we came away quite impressed after testing the app out for a while, though the $14.99/month subscription fee (after a free 7-day trial) will surely keep some potential users away.In our tests, the app was very responsive though we should point out that it also crashed a few times during our tests this morning. Songs generally started to play after just a few seconds, though your mileage may vary depending on your local network. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts last_img read more