North West man charged for murdering “Ninja”

first_imgWhat was supposed to be a festive holiday drink turned tragic when a 33-year-old gold miner allegedly stabbed his friend to death during a row over alcohol at Waramuri Mission in Region One (Barima-Waini).Exactly one week following the incident, the miner was arraigned before the Chief Magistrate, Ann McLennan on Wednesday when he was not required to plead to the indictable charge.According to the prosecution’s case, Navin Harris murdered Rondea Peters, called “Ninja”, on December 20, 2017 at Waramuri Mission, Moruca in the North West District.Reports indicate that the two men were imbibing when the now deceased man accused Harris of stealing his liquor. An argument ensued and quickly escalated to a physical scuffle during which Peters was reportedly stabbed to death with a knife.The case was transferred to be heard at the Aquaro Magistrate’s Court in Region-One.last_img read more

Qualcomms new wireless VR headsets work with PCs too

first_img Share your voice Apr 30 • Facebook’s new Oculus Rift S vs. Oculus Quest: Which VR headset is for you? reading • Qualcomm’s new wireless VR headsets work with PCs, too Like a future Oculus Quest that works with your PCAt last year’s GDC, Qualcomm showed off a next-generation standalone VR headset using a Snapdragon 845 chip and eye tracking. This year’s headset design takes the same chip and adds 802.11ad wireless 60GHz connection, so it can wirelessly connect with a PC and act as its VR headset, too. The wireless connection will have 16ms latency, according to Qualcomm.The PC streams low-latency graphics and game content to the headset, which sends its built-in six degrees of freedom room tracking back to the PC. It’s similar to the way HTC Vive’s wireless PC headset already works. What’s most interesting here, though, is that the VR headset and PC will split processing.Since VR processing will be handled by the PC and the headset’s Snapdragon 845 chip, according to Swart, this means PCs could run VR off lower-end CPUs (but the onboard PC graphics would likely need to be the same). PCs or consoles would need 802.11ad Wi-Fi, and also run Qualcomm software that enables this communication and processing with these upcoming headsets. According to Qualcomm, PC content and games won’t need any alteration at all. A preview of how 5G VR will work?Swart explains the initiative as a stepping stone to eventually having one headset that does both AR and VR, local and wirelessly over 5G. We’re not there yet, but these headsets will connect to PCs in a similar way to how they may connect over 5G in the future.That same split processing is what Qualcomm envisions in future 5G-enabled hardware, mixing some rendering in the cloud and some in-headset. While these headsets are designed to connect to PCs and local devices, eventually they could mix sources from the 5G cloud, local devices and more.screen-shot-2019-03-15-at-11-57-40-pmThe first VR headset with 802.11ad will be the Pico Neo2. Qualcomm One hardware device so farWe don’t know where else this technology will appear, but expect headsets to start arriving this year, according to Qualcomm’s Swart. First up is a Pico Neo2 VR headset that will be “Boundless XR for PC” compatible and have a Snapdragon 845 chip. While the idea of “Boundless for XR” imagines AR and VR devices with wireless tethering, Swart admits that for now, VR headsets will be the major focus, with AR (mixed reality) coming further down the road. Future Snapdragon-enabled AR headsets, such as nReal’s compact glasses, could be possible candidates.htc-viveThe Vive Cosmos, teased at CES in January, remains a mystery but promises similar ideas. CNET Is this what Vive Cosmos is?Qualcomm’s partners so far include software partners Framestore and ZeroLight, hardware partners Pico, Goertek and WNC, and… HTC Vive. Which raises the question: Is this a preview of what the mysterious, multi-connectable Vive Cosmos will be?Qualcomm won’t say, and HTC hasn’t confirmed anything yet. But if this means premium standalone headsets could also connect to PCs wirelessly, then maybe this is what the next generation of VR and AR will look like. This would make sense for the next Microsoft HoloLens (which also runs off a Qualcomm chip) as much as the next Oculus Rift or Vive.Qualcomm’s reference designs have been a pretty good predictor of the future: The company’s standalone Snapdragon 820 headset preceded the Oculus Go. Its Snapdragon 835 standalone reference led to the Lenovo Mirage Solo, HTC Vive Focus and Oculus Quest. Qualcomm already has a parallel vision of the future of AR and VR at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, with compact, possibly low-cost VR and AR headsets that will plug into 5G phones via USB-C. These newly announced PC-connected standalone wireless headsets look to be larger and more expensive than those USB-C plug-in possibilities. But it suggests that a lot of convergence is on the way for VR and AR in the next few years.CNET will be demoing the tech from GDC, so stay tuned for impressions to come. Apr 30 • How to preorder Oculus Quest and Rift S right now Wearable Tech 16 Photos See All Game Developers Conference • Oculus Quest virtual reality headset revealed Mar 21 • Google Stadia puts Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC gaming on notice Tags 2 Game Developers Conference Comments Mar 21 • Intel intros 9th-gen Core H mobile CPUs, Graphics Command Center Qualcomm There are just too many VR helmets and goggles out there — getting even one on your face is enough of a struggle. But Qualcomm’s new vision for its next generation of standalone VR headsets has a solution to that problem. Qualcomm is developing VR headsets that will work as wireless PC-connected, head-mounted displays. Hardware will start arriving later this year, according to Qualcomm, and it’ll be available for demo at this year’s Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.The new initiative, called “Boundless XR for PC,” uses Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 processor combined with a wireless 802.11ad chip that will allow high-bandwidth 60GHz connections to a PC or console that’s ready to communicate with it. The VR headset will be a standalone device, like the upcoming Oculus Quest, but when it’s near a PC, it’ll double as a wireless way to play PC games and apps. And it could even hint at where AR headsets such as the HoloLens 2 will head next. Qualcomm’s Hugo Swart explained how it works in a conversation with CNET ahead of GDC. Qualcomm Virtual Realitylast_img read more

Researchers successfully transform liquid deuterium into a metal

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Pair claim they have turned hydrogen to metal Citation: Researchers successfully transform liquid deuterium into a metal (2015, June 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-06-successfully-liquid-deuterium-metal.html More information: Direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium, Science 26 June 2015: Vol. 348 no. 6242 pp. 1455-1460. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa7471ABSTRACTEighty years ago, it was proposed that solid hydrogen would become metallic at sufficiently high density. Despite numerous investigations, this transition has not yet been experimentally observed. More recently, there has been much interest in the analog of this predicted metallic transition in the dense liquid, due to its relevance to planetary science. Here, we show direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium. Experimental determination of the location of this transition provides a much-needed benchmark for theory and may constrain the region of hydrogen-helium immiscibility and the boundary-layer pressure in standard models of the internal structure of gas-giant planets.Press release (Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at Sandia National Labs working with another team from the University of Rostock in Germany, has succeeded in squeezing liquid deuterium into becoming what appeared to be a metal. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their new technique which has brought researchers closer to the ultimate goal of creating solid metallic hydrogen. Schematic phase diagram of hydrogen. The figure shows the four known solid phases I to IV and two observed liquid phases, together with the predicted atomic liquid. Blue rings imply rotating quantum molecules, wiggly lines imply entangled rotor state, and solid bonds are where calculation shows a covalent bond. Credit: Science 26 June 2015: Vol. 348 no. 6242 pp. 1429-1430. DOI: 10.1126/science.aac6626center_img Journal information: Science © 2015 Phys.org Explore further Back in 1935, a pair of researchers, Hillard Bell Huntington and Eugene Wigner first showed via theory that it should be possible to create solid metallic hydrogen—all that was needed was sufficient pressure. Since that time, various teams have attempted to prove that theory correct, but to date, none have been successful. In this new effort, the research team has developed a new way to add pressure that does not cause other problems. Other than pride, the only real benefit of pursuing the objective is the information that can be gleaned from such efforts, information that might prove useful in studying other planets, for example—it could shed light on the forces necessary to produce observed phenomenon.Up till now, the technique used to pressurize hydrogen, has been based on squeezing samples of it between two diamond tips—such experiments have shown that it is possible to get compounds rich in hydrogen to become metal-like.In this new effort, the researchers noted that using the dual diamond tip approach was unlikely to result in achieving the ultimate goal due to the problem of sample materials becoming too reactive. They chose to go another route, making use of the massive Sandia Z machine—it is capable of creating magnetic fields up to 20 mega gauss—they first pressurized a sample of liquid deuterium (a hydrogen isotope) then caused a jolt of current from the Z machine to move through an electrode, which in turn hit the front of the container holding the deuterium—that caused a shockwave to move through the sample, condensing it further. As the material was condensed, the researchers measured how well the sample reflected light, a common means for identifying a metal. As the sample was condensed, it moved from a transparent state, to one that was reflective. This, the team claims, shows that the material clearly moved from an insulator to a metal.The results by this new team are the closest yet to creating solid metallic hydrogen and add further proof that it can be done, if the right means are applied. It will also likely rekindle efforts by others to be the first to reach the goal.last_img read more

A New Tool to Help Businesses Check Out Whos Checking In

first_img Your customers are on the go, and nowadays their whereabouts are your business. Mobile location applications, aka check-in apps or geosocial media apps, help friends find who’s hanging out where. But the apps, including Foursquare, Gowalla, Facebook Places and Google Latitude, are also powerful tools that allow businesses to connect with customers and craft special deals tied to social media interactions.The challenge? Figuring out which check-in apps customers are using. Though Foursquare emerged as the early app of choice, it’s still too early in the geosocial media game to favor one and ignore the rest. That could leave businesses in the unfortunate position of having to spend time and resources developing separate marketing campaigns for each of the check-in apps, and then trying to track the effectiveness of each one separately.Enter Geotoko, a marketing tool that helps businesses find out who has checked in at their locations. The company was founded by a group of friends attending the 2010 SXSW Interactive conference in Austin, Texas. They recognized what the surging appeal of the location apps could do for merchants who had an analytical grip on the check-in activity on their premises.As with all great ideas, cocktails were involved. “You could see on Foursquare which bars everyone was going to that week, so you could tell where the best time was going to be, and you could see people moving from one bar to the next, so you knew where your friends were going to be,” says Adarsh Pallian, co-founder and CEO of Geotoko. “We wanted to build a platform that wasn’t just limited to Foursquare, where you could connect and set up a promotional campaign that worked across all of these apps.”For $10 a day, plus a one-time setup fee, Geotoko offers small businesses the ability to create a campaign, choose locations affected, publish the campaign on the check-in app and monitor daily check-ins, check-in times and other stats. It also offers infographics, including heat maps, to businesses with multiple locations, which make it easier to determine where campaigns are having the most impact. “We figured that if we were going to allow people to set up these campaigns across platforms,” Pallian says, “it made sense to show them how well they worked.”  Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 2 min read This story appears in the May 2011 issue of . Subscribe » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global April 26, 2011 Register Now »last_img read more