Sirleaf Joins Obama at Mandela’s Centenary

first_imgFlashback: Madam Sirleaf with Ex-South African President Jacob Zuma in 2008.Former President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf is currently in South Africa to participate in celebrations marking the 100th anniversary of South Africa’s former President Nelson Mandela’s birth, a dispatch has said.On Tuesday, July 17, according to the dispatch, former United States President Barack Obama delivered the 16th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture.It may be recalled that in 2008, former President Sirleaf delivered the Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture in Johannesburg, South Africa. Tuesday’s lecture was preceded by a panel discussion that featured former President Sirleaf, former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan and the former Foreign Affairs Minister of Algeria Lakhdar Brahimi at the Obama Foundation gathering of young African leaders.Those events were also preceded by the launch of the “Obama Foundation Leaders: Africa Program,” a year-long initiative of leaders of Africa that will connect 200 emerging leaders from across the African continent to take on challenges in their communities.Four Liberians, including H. Zaizay, Gbovadeh Gbilia, Jarius Greaves and Mlen-Too Wesley, were selected to form part of the inaugural class of the “Obama Foundation Leaders: Africa Program.”  They joined 196 young leaders from 43 other African countries to benefit from a year-long leadership development and civic engagement program aimed at training, supporting, and connecting emerging African leaders as a means to creating positive change in their communities.In a related development, Madam Sirleaf will today join the Elders, an independent group of global leaders working together for peace and human rights, in highlighting the extraordinary contributions made by a group of 100 brilliant grassroots organizations.Those organizations, classified as “Sparks of Hope,” are positively impacting communities in Africa and across the globe.As part of today’s events, Madam Sirleaf will again join a panel discussion with Madam Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland, and Raj Panjabi, Co-founder and CEO of Last Mile Health, which is one of the “100 Sparks of Hope.”Today’s discussion will center on world peace, access to health, justice, and equality.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Announcing the Newest Geocacher of the Month

first_img SharePrint Related The earned, never for sale, Geocacher of the Month GeocoinA geocacher from the plains of the United States joins the ranks of Geocachers of the Month around the world. Dozens of comments shined a light on a geocacher who reaches out to those who are new to the adventure and helps inspire those who’ve geocached for years. While there is only one Geocacher of the Month, each of the nominees is already a winner, with a prize package headed their way.All the nominees add an important contribution to their local communities and inspire the global geocaching community. Each will receive special recognition for their contribution to the adventure of geocaching. Before naming the Geocacher of the Month, Geocaching HQ reviews community input and blog comments. Each comment is read and posts in native languages are encouraged.bjmccacher has been part of the geocaching world since 2011. After cementing hundreds of new relationships fostering the joy of geocaching he’s being named Geocacher of the Month for February 2014.One comment reads, “Bjmccacher has been a great geocaching collaborator and really helped raise the bar for geocaching in Lincoln, NE (and in the central US)! Many of his creative ideas have led to outstanding geocaching trails and series attracting folks from all over North America (see the numerous posts below). He is also incredibly inventive and is always coming up with new and interesting ways to geocache–it’s no surprise that many of his geocaches are some of the most favorited caches in Nebraska. Finally, as a host and ambassador to visiting geocachers, he is simply incredible. He goes the extra mile in every possible way! ”If you know an outstanding geocacher who should be considered for the honor, simply fill out this webform.Every nomination must include the following items and abide by the following guidelines:Your name, the name of your nominee, their usernameA picture of the nomineeDescription (200 or more words) explaining why he or she deserves to be the Geocacher of the MonthPlease inform your nominee that you have submitted them for the award. Nominations for Geocacher of the Month are accepted at any time.Congratulations again to bjmccacher for being recognized as the Geocacher of the Month for February.bjmccacher – Geocacher of the Month Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Big Data Boosts Storage Needs – And Opportunities

first_imgMassive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock. Tags:#HP#Storage Evolution 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… IT + Project Management: A Love Affair michael singer Storage has always been important to the enterprise – but the rise of big data applications puts unprecedented pressure on storage strategies and technologies. It’s also delivering unprecedented benefits to the companies that figure out how to do it right.So how big is big data? Approximately 2.5 quintillion bytes of data being created every day – 90% of it unstructured, according to IBM’s estimates. Given that data can be in the form of customer sales interactions, corporate logistics information, or communications with partners and suppliers, companies are faced with tough choices. Data centers full of standard 2TB hard drives were not designed to handle big data.What is needed is a combination of robust storage hardware and software that allow for quick access to relevant information.Some Need Storage More Than OthersWhile big data and the information storage needed for analyzing and containing giant data sets are common amongst mid- to large-scale enterprises, some need big data storage solutions more than others. Earth scientists, engineering modeling, media and entertainment, and rapidly growing online services all contribute to the massive amounts of data being generated. The U.S. Library of Congress, for example, had 235TB of storage in April 2011. For this information to be analyzed, it must be stored properly for instant access.“Whether it is storage systems architectures or storage devices enabling big data applications, the growth of content is increasing the amount of large data sets that enterprises must work with,” wrote Tom Coughlin, president of Coughlin Associates, a storage analyst and consultancy, in a recent blog post. “These big data applications require managing, protecting and analyzing large and complex data content.”Analysts with McKinsey and Co. estimate nearly all sectors in the U.S. economy had an average of at least 200TB of stored data per company with more than 1,000 employees. That’s twice the size of U.S. retailer Wal-Mart’s data warehouse in 1999. Many sectors had more than a petabyte in mean stored data per company. European companies have also amassed a massive storage capacity (almost 11 exabytes). That’s 70% of the computer storage space created in the U.S. (more than 16 exabytes) in 2010.But storing this information for data analysis can prove pricey, prompting enterprises to look for innovative ways to consolidate data sets and reconfigure connections between big data applications.Overcoming Cost ConstraintsWhile data warehouses cost tens or hundreds of millions of dollars to start with, the cost of storage can increase astronomically from there whenused for big data projects.The average cost of a supported Hadoop distribution costs about $4,000 per node annually. A Hadoop cluster requires between 125 and 250 nodes and costs about $1 million, according to John Bantleman, CEO of big-data database developer RainStor. And companies like Yahoo have 200PB data sets spread across 50,000 network nodes!“We know one thing is proven: The benefits of leveraging Big Data will outweigh IT investment,” Bantleman wrote in a blog. “Cost by how much is the question.”Bantleman suggests there are two key areas that will continue decreasing the cost of big data storage:Re-using existing SQL query language and existing business intelligence tools against data within Hadoop.Compressing data at its most basic level, which not only reduces storage requirements, but drives down the number of nodes and simplify the infrastructureAnother factor affecting cost and complexity centers on where these storage arrays are physically located. New technologies are bringing some storage and storage functionality back much closer to the server and moving some further away in cloud storage. Increasingly, storage functions will be distributed inside and outside of the data center, in internal and external clouds.More importantly, storage will be a key enabler of new business process and business intelligence applications that will be able to digest and present orders of magnitude more data than current applications, says Wikibon.com CTO David Floyer.Storage-as-a-Service Meets Big-Data-as-a-ServiceThe economics of data movement are tipping the scales towards distributed compute services. Processing the data where it is sitting will be the model for the next generation of platforms. The infrastructure for this is falling into place.As big data transforms from traditional closed data collection and analysis, companies are increasingly considering the benefits of cloud-based services. Online applications and services now create new sources for expanding data that create new challenges for fast access and fast use of information. Big data therefore results in big storage and big business opportunities.While storage housed on-premise provides a controlled advantage for some storage systems dedicated to big data analytics, the more logical extension would be the expansion of online storage services for big data analytics. The concept of Big-Data-as-a-Service (BDaaS) is expected to debut in the Asia Pacific region in 2013, according to analysts with research firm IDC.“We have seen cloud services, hosted data centers, service providers, and system integrators all expanding their XaaS offerings,” Craig Stires, research director for big data and analytics, IDC Asia/Pacific predicted in his 2013 outlook. “The implementation and execution of a provisioned BDaaS solution will leverage platform, networking, storage, and compute services. IDC expects to see a breakthrough BDaaS offering in 2013, which will leverage all of these assets, as well as solve the challenge of how customers will on-board their data.”Whether in the cloud or in the data center, companies will look for ways to effectively cut costs without having to reduce the amount of information they work with. IT departments will be faced with the challenge of how to integrate these new sources of data within existing well-structured data management systems.Organizations have invested considerable time in agreeing on what data is to be included into traditional analytical data storage, how it is to be defined, ownership, and permissions. The inclusion of new sources of data, streaming in at high speeds, with potentially large issues around data quality, will be a massive challenge. Finding the most efficent way to store this data will competitive advantages to organizations that do it right. Related Posts last_img read more

MFLN “Network News” – November 2016

first_imgThis month we are excited to introduce you to one of our people “behind the scenes”.Karen Jeannette is the Social Media Strategist for the Military Families Learning Network and brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the MFLN’s leadership team.  Currently, Karen helps Military Families Learning Network concentration area teams incorporate social media into guided and informal professional development opportunities.Don’t forget to check out our great line up of professional development opportunities for the month of November!last_img