You Can Use This Operating System and USB Drive to Revive Derelict

first_img We’ve all got an older computer or laptop laying around the house that we just can’t be bothered to fix. Maybe it’s riddled with malware because Aunt Clara couldn’t figure out how to stop clicking on those pesky pop-up ads. Or maybe you just didn’t feel like reformatting it after installing and reinstalling things over and over again as the years went by. Whatever the case may be, you’ve probably got one or have one somewhere, and you don’t have much you can or want to do with it.Until now, that is. The creators of the Raspberry Pi have created an experimental operating system known as Pixel that’s meant to revitalize computers just like the ones I described above. It was originally made for the Raspberry Pi itself, which runs about $35, but the company is deciding to offer more than that. Pixel is actually a modified version of Debian, a version of Linux, and it’s got bits of software already installed on it. It’s meant to act as lighter, an airier operating system that doesn’t rely on a whole heaping helping of resources. But it still offers valuable software most users typically run in a normal day of computer usage.Of course, there are a few catches, though none of them are major. Pixel itself can only run when booted from a USB drive, so if you do install it for one of your laptops, you’ll have to leave your USB drive on the computer even when the novelty of running the OS has run all the way out. It also won’t work on all Macs, and you don’t get a copy of Minecraft, though if you’re a Minecraft fan you probably already own a version on most platforms anyway.But if you’re interested in bringing otherwise perfectly functional computers back to life, you can try Pixel from the official blog post here, and make sure you report back on your results. I’m sure we’ve all got some sort of tech graveyard floating around in our lives. Stay on target Lyra Is a Handheld Gaming System Powered by a Raspberry PiRaspberry Pi Used to Steal 500 MB of NASA Data last_img read more

The Weirdest Simulation Games of All Time

first_img The simulation genre has been a pillar of PC gaming for decades, as the robust control mechanisms of PC and mouse let players experience the thrill of flying planes, managing cities and more. Over time, these simulators became more and more esoteric and complicated, with some flight simulators requiring a manual as thick as an actual aircraft’s to comprehend. They also got a lot weirder. In this feature, we’ll dive deep into the burgeoning simulation genre and bring out eleven of the weirdest and worst examples.Robot Vacuum SimulatorPlenty of video games let you play as robots, but they’re mostly murder robots. If you’re looking for something a little more helpful, give Robot Vacuum Simulator from Stolidus Simulations might be right up your alley. The Norwegian developers have really put some thought into how it feels to be a Roomba, limited in your mobility and unable to contend with even the smallest staircase as you steadily glide around a home sucking up dust and dirt. A soothing modern jazz soundtrack caps off the whole experience.See Robot Vacuum Simulator on Stolidus SimulationsOil Platform SimulatorThere’s a whole microgenre of sim games that are all about managing ludicrously complex machines, and Oil Platform Simulator might be the most niche of the lot. Oil Platform Simulator puts you in charge of a startup fossil fuel operation – you must locate a drill site, assemble a platform and then run it at a profit, all through navigating obtuse and clunky menus. Every so often you get to steer a tanker ship arduously back to shore at glacial speeds, hoping you don’t fall asleep at the wheel and cause another ecological disaster.See Oil Platform Simulator on AmazonViscera Cleanup DetailAfter you play through a level of a first-person shooter, have you ever wondered what happens to the blood and gibs you leave behind? That’s where Viscera Cleanup Detail comes in. This oddball indie game casts you as a space station janitor who has to clean up the effluvia of a repulsed – and repulsive – alien invasion. Using only a primitive mop and broom, you have to sweep up and throw away spent bullet casings, scrub alien blood off of walls, replace broken glass in windows, patch bullet holes and more. It’s both incredibly boring and oddly thrilling. The DLC that lets you clean up Santa’s workshop is worth a look as well.See Viscera Cleanup Detail on SteamSoda Drinker ProA less stressful simulation is 2016’s Soda Drinker Pro from Snowrunner Games, which lets you experience the pleasure of drinking a can of soda (or pop, depending on where you live) on a warm summer’s day. Or at least some of the pleasure, because you can’t actually taste it or have your thirst quenched by it. Use the WASD keys to move around the charmingly low-resolution landscape, raise the soda to your mouth with the left mouse button and sip with the right. It’s just that simple. When you’ve finished your cup (illustrated by the SODA meter in the HUD), you’ll be brought to a new drinking location to do it all over again.See Soda Drinker Pro on SteamStreet Cleaning SimulatorPlenty of games tackle the extremely dull subject of “driving very slowly and carefully,” but only one adds in the thrill of pushing trash into the gutters.See Street Cleaning Simulator on AmazonMy Summer CarThere are lots of driving games on the market, but I can confidently say you’ve never played anything quite like My Summer Car. The product of Finnish studio Amistech, it puts you in the shoes of a 19 year old home alone in rural Finland in 1995 with only a hand-me-down car for company. But this isn’t just any car – when you boot up the game, your trusty Satsuma Amp is just a pile of scrap, and you have to assemble the whole damn thing yourself, every nut and bolt. It’s entirely possible to screw it up, too, and leave your amiable burnout with an undriveable chariot. With a wicked sense of humor and tons of style, this is one of the most unique sim games ever released.See My Summer Car on SteamAdvanced Lawnmower SimulatorWhat kind of person would make a game about mowing lawns? The same person who would make it for the antiquated ZX Spectrum computer in 2001. Advanced Lawnmower Simulator is by far the most primitive game on this list. Originally conceived as a hoax in the pages of Your Sinclair magazine in the UK, some wag made it a real deal a month later. Even though you can choose from six different mowers to handle the expanse of grass, they all handle exactly the same because the game has only one control: the M key, which makes the mower roll over one square of the lawn when tapped. We’d hate to see the basic lawnmower simulator.Home ImprovisationOf all the activities that modern man pursues, “putting together Ikea furniture” is pretty close to the bottom of the enjoyment scale. That didn’t stop a team from replicating it in the digital world — in VR even! Home Improvisation gives you dozens of potential furniture items for assembly with one part missing: the instructions. Up to four players can collaborate – or screw things up – to put together tables, bookshelves, couches and more. And, of course, you can let your imagination go wild and use the legs, shelves and other bits to build your own absurd and dangerous furniture contraptions.See Home Improvisation on SteamToilet TycoonBusiness simulators, also called “tycoon games,” have a long and storied history. Games like Rollercoaster Tycoon make the nuts and bolts of accounting fun by letting you build massive, potentially fatal amusement park rides with your profits. Toilet Tycoon… not so much. This bizarre 2006 game from the Netherlands puts you in charge of the public toilets for a small town, pitting your dumper management skills against three AI opponents who are also trying to construct their own toilet empires. You can install different units in each stall, set prices, and go negative by hiring scofflaws to write graffiti and vomit in your competitor’s restrooms.See Toilet Tycoon on AmazonSinking SimulatorFor many of the simulators on this list, they’re born of a simple and pure desire to create something new in the world. If you’re developer Francis Racicot, that’s a deep and abiding need to watch stuff sink. Sinking Simulator is exactly what it says on the tin: a 2D physics sandbox designed to let you set up scenarios where things get swallowed by the merciless maw of the sea. In the game, you can sink anything your mind can imagine — literally; the engine lets you import PNGs and builds physics simulations around them. It’s also hilariously buggy, which is a bonus.Dinner DateThe creation of Dutch designer Jeroen Stout, Dinner Date could be subtitled “Awkward Romantic Anticipation Simulator.” The premise is simple: you play a man named Julian Luxembourg who has prepared a beautiful home-cooked meal for a young lady at his home. Unfortunately, she’s running late, leaving Julian with nothing to do but sit at the table and wait for her. You can sip wine, eat bread, smoke a cigarette or tap impatiently on the table, but your actions have absolutely no impact on whether Meiko will show up or not over the course of the experience’s 25 minute playtime.See Dinner Date on SteamChemical Spillage SimulationCleaning is a recurring theme in many of these simulation games, because for some reason it’s more fun to do in the virtual world than the real one. But rarely do you have the opportunity to scrub up after potentially fatal chemical spills (we hope). Chemical Spillage Simulator is the answer to that. Released in 2013, it recruits you as a novice member of the Special Chemical Disaster Prevention unit, traveling to disaster sites to analyze and collect toxic sludge, gas and other nasty stuff.See Chemical Spillage Simulator on AmazonPC Building SimulatorIf you really want to get meta with your gaming, play PC Building Simulator so you can build a PC in your PC, dogg. Most of these simulators aren’t going to train you for anything you’ll do in real life, no matter how boring, but if you’re reading this site you’ve probably at least considered building a computer from parts. In the game, you play the sole proprietor of a repair shop slash IT department and have to order components and build machines to customer budgets and specifications, all in first-person view. The game quickly became a viral success when it launched on Steam and now boasts dozens of real-life hardware partnerships to make it that much more realistic.See PC Building Simulator on SteamMore on Geek.com:The Complete History of Platform GamesFrom ‘Missile Command’ to ‘Fallout 76’: A History of Video Game Nuclear WarThe Deadliest Assassins in Video Games Sorry, You Can’t Date Keanu Reeves in ‘Cyberpunk 2077”Star Wars Pinball’ Has Your Favorite Brand in Ball Form Stay on targetlast_img read more